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Faculty Programs

Programs offered to the faculty by the University of Virginia Library

Research Sprints

Call for Proposals

Research Sprints, hosted by the University of Virginia Library, offer faculty the opportunity to partner with a team of expert librarians on a specific project or component of a broader project. Sprints differ from one-time consultations in their timing and depth of interaction. Individuals or teams of faculty will work intensively with librarians for four and a half working days. The intention is for the entire team — faculty and library staff — to work without distractions for that period of time to produce a tangible product or outcome.

The program supports projects at any phase of the scholarly lifecycle, providing an excellent opportunity for faculty who want to get started on a new project or overcome an obstacle on an existing project.  For example, startup projects might benefit from literature reviews or facilitated brainstorming, or from the design of a roadmap toward the application of technology to a research or a teaching problem; in-progress projects might require help on information or data organization or curation.  Projects nearing completion might benefit from assistance in managing scholarly communications or designing programs, or identifying and evaluating intellectual property or copyright issues.  We welcome proposals for projects that are exploratory and experimental, as well as those that are well advanced. 

Potential project areas include, but are not limited to, the following areas in which we have in-house expertise: 

  • Archival research
  • Data and metadata creation, management, analysis, and preservation
  • Literature reviews
  • Intellectual property/copyright
  • Application of technology to a research or teaching problem
  • Grant proposals
  • Program planning
  • Collaborative or interdisciplinary team start-up
  • Open educational resource adoption or creation (open textbooks, teaching videos, etc.)
  • Pedagogy and instructional design (course assignment redesign, creation of learning objects, etc.)
  • Preservation of scholarly work
  • Publication proposal or journal creation

Logistics

  • Sprint timeframe: May 15-19, 2023 
    • Teams will work intensively for three to four days within that period, depending on the needs of the project.
    • Friday 9:30-12:30 is reserved for a cohort meeting and report-out, attendance required.
      • Other sprint sessions for select projects might be available for summer 2023 based on faculty and staff availability.
      • The exact daily schedule is flexible based on project needs.
  • We anticipate an in-person event (although teams will make the final determination).
  • Each team will hold a pre-sprint orientation meeting, date determined by project team.

Who is eligible? How do I apply?

  • This program is open to anyone holding a faculty appointment as well as senior professional research staff at the University of Virginia who expect to be employed by the University during the school year of 2023-24.   Awardees who become aware in the spring that they will not be returning to the University for the fall 2023 semester should notify Judith Thomas and decline their award.
  • Individuals or teams may apply.  For team proposals, one faculty or senior professional research staff member should serve as the project director and should submit the application.  Graduate students may participate as team members.
  • Application deadline: February 17, 2023
  • Notifications:  the week of April 2, 2023

What are the selection criteria?

  • The proposed work can be completed in four days.
  • The project will have an impact on the faculty member’s research or teaching, or on their work with the community.
  • The project has a convincing rationale for partnering with the library to accomplish the project goals, with a vision for how library staff will contribute to this work.
  • Staff with the necessary skills are available to support the project.  

What are the expectations of the recipients?

  • Attend a pre-sprint orientation meeting to clarify goals for the sprint and familiarize library staff with research.
  • Attend all sprint sessions within the targeted week.
  • Submit a written reflection on your experience in the program.
  • Report on your project during the final cohort meeting.

Other considerations

  • This program cannot promise additional resources (e.g., software, systems, project maintenance) after the sprint has ended.  However, we will advise on strategies for achieving long-term project goals.
  • We recommend that all project proposers, especially those whose projects involve the application of technology to research or teaching, consult with a staff member before submitting an application.  Please contact Judith Thomas (jthomas@virginia.edu) for a referral.

  • You may be contacted by the selection committee with additional questions.

Learn more 

Apply now

2022

Janet Kong-Chow, American Studies and English, College of Arts and Sciences: This Sprint supports early research for a book manuscript exploring the processes through which the modern archive (physical and digital) came to be understood as a site of knowledge production in the West, and as such, how its curatorial practices continue to shape and transform ideas of race, ethnicity, gender, and postcoloniality in the American cultural imagination.

Library team:

  • Molly Schwartzburg, Curator, Albert & Shirley Small Special Collections Library
  • Meg Kennedy, Curator of Material Culture
  • Lauren Longwell, University Archivist
  • Chris Ruotolo, Director, Research in the Arts and Humanities

Mary Kuhn, English, College of Arts and Sciences: This Sprint team will research the cultural history of Paris Green, a toxic arsenic-based compound widely used in domestic and agricultural settings in the late nineteenth-century United States. The project will draw on scientific and popular periodicals, agricultural and gardening manuals, advertisements, wallpaper samples, and other domestic material culture.

Library team:

  • Sherri Brown, Librarian for English
  • Maggie Nunley, Science and Engineering Research Librarian
  • Jenny Coffman, Science and Engineering Research Librarian
  • Keith Weimer, Librarian for History, Politics, and Religious Studies

Moira O’Neill, Urban and Environmental Planning, School of Architecture and Law School: This Research Sprint will conduct an interdisciplinary literature review to support writing a book on how local governments implement climate and fair housing policy. The team will review both urban planning and law literature in their investigation of topics relating to spatial inequity, community participation in policy-making, and land use regulation.

Library team:

  • Rebecca Coleman, Research Librarian for Architecture
  • Christine Slaughter, Social Sciences Research Librarian
  • Dan Radthorne, Reference Librarian, School of Law

Michael Puri, Music, College of Arts and Sciences: The goal of this Research Sprint is to flesh out the cultural politics surrounding the relationship between French and German music at the turn of the twentieth century. The composers Maurice Ravel and Richard Strauss receive particular attention as prominent and closely related representatives of the two traditions.

Library team:

  • Amy Hunsaker, Librarian for Music & the Performing Arts
  • Miguel Valladares-Llata, Librarian for Romance Languages and Latin American Studies

Dylan Rogers, Art History and Archeology, College of Arts and Sciences: The Sprint will provide research support for an interdisciplinary book project on the history of the University of Virginia, which seeks to employ methodologies of archaeology, art history, and architectural history to understand better how the University’s physical imprint and cultural significance developed over time. The Sprint will lay the crucial groundwork for identifying and collating the numerous available archival materials housed in the University’s Library that provide insight into UVA’s complex history.

Library team:

  • Lucie Stylianopoulos, Librarian for Art, Archaeology, & Indigenous Studies
  • Ann Burns, Metadata Librarian
  • Rebecca Coleman, Research Librarian for Architecture
  • Meg Kennedy, Curator of Material Culture
  • Lauren Longwell, University Archivist

Jessica Sewell, Planning, School of Architecture: This Sprint will provide support for the forthcoming book, “Gender and Vernacular Architecture,” which is simultaneously a primer for studying gender in vernacular architecture and a guide and manifesto for inclusive methodologies in the study of the built environment. The Sprint will assist in finding and acquiring illustrations, supporting and enhancing the argument, and boosting the beauty and accessibility of the book.

Library team:

  • Rebecca Coleman, Research Librarian for Architecture
  • Erin Pappas, Librarian for the Humanities
  • Brandon Butler, Director, Information Policy

Michael Sheehy, Contemplative Sciences Center: The Sprint will research topics at the intersection of sensory deprivation and meditation with a focus on self-emergent and hallucinatory visual experiences during dark exposure. The team will collaboratively identify multimedia resources on preselected topics in Religious Studies, Anthropology, Psychology, and Neuroscience.

Library team:

  • Keith Weimer, Librarian for History, Politics, and Religious Studies
  • Nawang Thokmey, Librarian for Tibetan, Himalayan, and Contemplative Studies
  • Andrea Denton, Research and Data Services Manager, Health Sciences Library

Ben Small, Architecture, School of Architecture: This project takes a close look at visitor centers commissioned by various government organizations in the United States and asks how these buildings might be understood in terms of local concepts of place and broader political agendas. The project team will collect and interpret documentation such as commission contracts, brochures, and more, related to publicly-funded visitor centers.

Library team:

  • Rebecca Coleman, Librarian for Architecture
  • Christine Slaughter, Social Sciences Research Librarian
  • Penny White, Reference Librarian, Special Collections Library
  • Trillian Hosticka, Reference Librarian and Regional Depository Librarian

2021

Shilpa Davé, Media Studies, Arts and Sciences: This Sprint will investigate how media representations of English speakers and the relationship to the English language comment on racial and social cultural histories of the United States.

Library team:

  • Erin Pappas, Research Librarian for the Humanities
  • Christine Slaughter, Social Sciences Research Librarian
  • Sherri Brown, Librarian for English
  • Keith Weimer, Librarian for History, Politics, and Religious Studies
  • Phil McEldowney, Librarian for Middle East and South Asia Studies
  • Haley Gillilan, Undergraduate Student Success Librarian

Katy Ambrose, Music, Arts and Sciences: This Sprint will provide research support for a book about horn players of African descent in the United States, with a large focus on enslaved huntsmen on the estates of the “Founding Fathers” in Virginia and the mid-Atlantic.

Library team:

  • Amy Hunsaker, Music and Performing Arts Librarian
  • Krystal Appiah, Special Collections Instruction Librarian
  • Regina Rush, Reference Librarian
  • David Whitesell, Curator, Albert & Shirley Small Special Collections Library

Erin Putalik, Architecture, School of Architecture: The Sprint team will research the ways in which formaldehyde-based adhesives and resins became so integral to contemporary building materials. The project will delve into patent history, case law, and key digital repositories of technical literature for building materials, with a focus on the 1940s-70s.

Library team:

  • Rebecca Coleman, Research Librarian for Architecture
  • Trillian Hosticka, Reference Librarian, and Regional Depository Librarian
  • Kristin Glover, Research Librarian, University of Virginia School of Law
  • Maggie Nunley, Teaching and Learning Librarian

Joel Thurston and Stephanie Shipp, Biocomplexity Institute: The Sprint team will conduct a literature review on team science as it relates to working in a virtual environment, and will develop a data collection plan targeting gaps in the literature with a focus on connecting team science practices to practical outcomes (e.g., overcoming communication obstacles, and strengthening interpersonal connections between team members).

Library team:

  • Christine Slaughter, Social Sciences Research Librarian
  • Jenn Huck, Data Librarian
  • Erich Purpur, Science and Engineering Research Librarian
  • Andrea Denton, Lecturer, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library
  • Jenny Coffman, Science and Engineering Research Librarian
  • Erin Pappas, Research Librarian for the Humanities

Nicole Bonino, Spanish, Italian and Portuguese, Arts & Sciences: The Sprint will provide research support for a multi-disciplinary book on the artistic and literary manifestations of migratory dynamics in the urban spaces of the “Southern Cone” (the southernmost area of South America). The project will analyze visual and plastic art, novels, and films highlighting issues of race, space, and social justice.

Library team:

  • Miguel Valladares-Llata, Librarian for Romance Languages and Latin American Studies
  • Lucie Stylianopoulos, Director of Academic Programs and Outreach
  • Leigh Rockey, Video Collections Librarian
  • Winston Barham, Music Collections Librarian

Toni Irving, Darden School: This Sprint will provide research support for a developing project about the relationship between 19th century arcades, consumer culture, and citizenship. The Sprint will lay a groundwork of archival research, related published scholarship, and public data sets to launch this project.

Library Team:

  • Keith Weimer, Librarian for History, Politics, and Religious Studies
  • Trillian Hosticka, Reference Librarian, and Regional Depository Librarian
  • Rebecca Coleman, Research Librarian for Architecture
  • Katrina Spencer, Librarian for African American and African Studies
  • Jenn Huck, Data Librarian
  • Christine Slaughter, Social Sciences Research Librarian

Priya Date, Biology, Engagement, Arts and Sciences: This Sprint will provide support to review current pedagogy literature in order to create a framework to integrate the arts in a science classroom, helping to redesign/restructure a sensory biology course such that it supports creativity and makes science learning accessible.

Library Team:

  • Maggie Nunley, Teaching and Learning Librarian
  • Bethany Mickel, Teaching and Instructional Design Librarian
  • Cecelia Parks, Undergraduate Student Success Librarian
  • Amy Hunsaker, Music and Performing Arts Librarian
  • Nancy Kechner, ADSTP Specialist
  • Jenny Coffman, Science and Engineering Research Librarian

Rachel Most, Anthropology, Dean’s Office, Arts and Sciences: This Sprint will provide research support for a chapter in a proposed book on higher education. The chapter focuses on who should go to college, why one should attend college, what one should expect in college, and why a liberal arts degree is preparation for a lifetime of various jobs and careers.

Library Team:

  • Cecelia Parks, Undergraduate Student Success Librarian
  • Halley Gillilan, Undergraduate Student Success Librarian
  • Ashley Hosbach, Education and Social Science Research Librarian

2020

Derrick Alridge, Curry School of Education & Human Development: Provide research support for a book project about the role of African American teachers in the civil rights movement. The project will draw on oral histories, teachers' personal papers, and various archives to discern teachers' activism inside and outside the classroom. 

Library team: 

  • Christine Slaughter (project manager), Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences
  • Ashley Hosbach, Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences
  • Sony Prosper, Special Collections
  • Keith Weimer, Arts & Humanities
  • Penny White, Special Collections

Kirsten Gelsdorf, Batten School:   Engage in research that will result in a book on that will include discourse, data, and case studies arguing for the global humanitarian imperative. The sprint will develop a research plan, including published scholarship, gray literature, and archival sources.  

 Library team:

  • Jenn Huck (project manager), Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences
  • Molly Schwartzburg, Special Collections
  • Christine Slaughter, Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences
  • Keith Weimer, Arts & Humanities
  • Trillian Hosticka, Information Services & Spaces

Adrienne Ghaly, Arts & Sciences New Curriculum, English: Provide research support for both a book project and a digital humanities collaboration with JSTORLabs to create visual essays tracking the cultural processes contributing to manmade species extinction in materials of everyday life.

Library team:

  • Sherri Brown (project manager), Arts & Humanities
  • Beth Blanton, Collection Management
  • Jeremy Bartczak, Metadata & Discovery
  • Jeremy Boggs, Scholars’ Lab
  • Ricky Patterson, Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences
  • Molly Schwartzburg, Special Collections

Jonathan Kropko, School of Data Science: Tech companies, from local startups to giants like Facebook and Google, have programs that use the expertise of tech and data professionals to work on projects to benefit the "social good". We study the rich history of collaboration between UVA researchers and the city of Charlottesville on community-involved projects and we use this history to generate recommendations and guidelines to help projects for the social good be ethical and successful. 

Library team:

  • Erich Purpur (project manager), Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences
  • Rebecca Coleman, Arts & Humanities
  • Jenn Huck, Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences
  • Heather Riser, Special Collections
  • Regina Rush, Special Collections

Heidi Nobles, College of Arts & Sciences, English: Heidi Nobles, English, College of Arts & Sciences: Expand archival materials for a developing course on writing processes and products by discovering additional archives, negotiating copyright issues, and creating innovative formats for publishing/producing course material.

Library team:

  • Maggie Nunley (project manager), Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences
  • Brandon Butler, Scholarly Communications
  • Sherri Brown, Arts & Humanities
  • Brenda Gunn, Special Collections
  • Cecelia Parks, Teaching & Learning

2019

Natasha Heller, Religious Studies, College of Arts & Sciences: Examine publication and citation practices in Buddhist Studies to provide a quantified overview of gender disparities in this field.

Library team:

  • Ricky Patterson (project manager), Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences
  • Shane Lin, Scholars’ Lab
  • Phil McEldowney, Arts & Humanities
  • Erin Pappas, Arts & Humanities
  • Nawang Thokmey, Arts & Humanities

Fiona Greenland, Sociology, College of Arts & Sciences: Provide research support for a new book project about the restitution of Nazi art plunder as a causal mechanism of moral development in American perceptions of the Holocaust.

Library team:

  • Christine Slaughter (project manager), Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences
  • Kristin Glover, Law Library
  • Barbie Selby, Arts & Humanities
  • Ammon Shepherd, Scholars’ Lab
  • Keith Weimer, Arts & Humanities

William Hitchcock, History, College of Arts & Sciences: Provide research support for a book project about American opposition to Nazism and the imperialist nations of Europe and Asia, illuminating America’s long history of combating fascism.

Library team:

  • Keith Weimer (project manager), Arts & Humanities
  • Erin Pappas, Arts & Humanities
  • Christine Slaughter, Arts & Humanities
  • Molly Schwartzburg, Special Collections Library
  • Bryan Kasik, Information Services and Spaces

Marcy Linton, Drama, College of Arts & Sciences: Devise a plan to document and provide intellectual access to the contents of the Drama Department’s Historic Collection of Dress.

Library team:

  • Jeremy Boggs (project manager), Scholars’ Lab
  • Bethany Anderson, Special Collections Library
  • Jeremy Bartczak, Metadata & Discovery Services
  • Ann Burns, Metadata & Discovery Services
  • Abby Flanigan, Arts & Humanities
  • Will Rourk, Scholars’ Lab
  • Lucie Stylianopoulos, Arts & Humanities

Katie Stranix and JT Bachman, Architecture, School of Architecture: Expand upon the ideas and the research of the project Rest Ops, which explores the potential of rest stops to provide moments of connection, meditation, and play.

Library team:

  • Rebecca Coleman (project manager), Arts & Humanities
  • Chris Gist, Scholars’ Lab
  • Drew Macqueen, Scholars’ Lab
  • Bill Corey, Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences
  • Erich Purpur Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences
  • Jenn Huck, Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences
  • Barbie Selby, Information Services and Spaces

Kelly Sulick, Music, College of Arts & Sciences. Create a research plan and a literature review across a number of fields relating to the work of the German sound artist/flutist/composer Christina Kubisch.

Library team:

  • Abby Flanigan (project manager), Arts & Humanities
  • Erin Pappas, Arts & Humanities
  • Ammon Shepherd, Scholars’ Lab
  • Lucie Stylianopoulos, Arts & Humanities