Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

Faculty Programs

Programs offered to the faculty by the University of Virginia Library

Course Enrichment Grants

Call for Proposals

Course Enrichment Grants, offered by the University of Virginia Library, provide support to faculty who would like to enhance students’ abilities to seek, evaluate, manage, and use information and data in scholarly contexts, as well as create new types of media-rich class assignments.

Faculty recipients of these grants will be awarded:

  • $2,500, which can be applied to summer wages or to a research account.
  • Dedicated support from experienced librarians, technologists, or other library staff.

The program is intended to fund projects that promote student learning in the areas described below. All funded projects will involve partnership with a team of library staff with expertise in the proposed topic. 

  • Enhance students’ ability to critically find, evaluate, interrogate, manage, and use information both within and beyond their field of study.
  • Help students to conduct archival research, gaining competencies in finding, using, and interpreting archival and primary source material.
  • Strengthen students’ ability to discover,  ethically use/reuse, collect, manage, store, and share data from a wide variety of sources.
  • Allow students to explore new technologies, such as video, audio, 3D, immersive, and maker-related projects, and produce course assignments in a variety of media.
  • Deepen student understanding through digital methods such as mapping, exhibit-building, text/image/sound analysis, or collaborative project design. 
  • Support faculty who wish to use open educational resources and practices in their courses.

Applications are welcome from all disciplines.  We especially encourage applications that explore the use of open educational resources as a means of practicing inclusive or active pedagogy.

Proposals should be for courses in which planning can be completed in anticipation of the course offering.  That means for Fall 2022 courses, planning should be undertaken in the summer 2022; and for J-Term 2023, Spring 2023, and Summer 2023 courses, planning should be completed before the start of the target semester.  

Who is eligible? How do I apply?

  • This program is open to anyone holding a faculty appointment at the University of Virginia who teaches semester-long courses (Fall, J-Term, Spring, or Summer).
  • The grant deadline is 2/14/2022.  Notifications will be made by 3/28/2022.

What are the selection criteria?

  • The project will have an impact on the faculty member's teaching and on student learning, and, if relevant, the community.
  • Information concepts and activities are well-integrated into the course.
  • The project has a convincing rationale for partnering with the library to accomplish course goals.
  • Staff with the necessary skills are available to support this project.

What are the expectations of the faculty?

  • Faculty will meet with their assigned library team at least three times before the deadline to plan the course and complete the syllabus.
  • Faculty will include at least one library team member on the course site.
  • Faculty will write a reflective essay on their experiences with the program.  

Other considerations:

  • We recommend that project proposers, especially those that involve the application of technology to teaching or learning, consult with a staff member before submitting an application.  Please talk to your department liaison or contact Judith Thomas (jthomas@virginia.edu) for a referral.
  • This program cannot promise implementation of academic technologies in the classroom (e.g., software, systems) or provide long-term support for specialty software.  However, we can advise on technologies and make referrals to appropriate support units on grounds.
  • You may be contacted by the selection committee with additional questions.

Learn more 

Attend an information session: 

See a list of previously funded projects. 

For questions about any aspect of the program, please email Judith Thomas at jthomas@virginia.edu

APPLY NOW

2021-2022

Francesca Calamita, Spanish, Italian and Portuguese, College of Arts & Sciences: First-year students of “Food for Feminist Global Thought” will learn how to develop connections between ideas covered in the seminar and everyday life through online and in-class cross-cultural reflections. They will also learn how to critically find, evaluate, and manage sources for their final presentation on food and gender across the globe.

Library team:

  • Erin Pappas, Research Librarian for the Humanities
  • Miguel Valladares-Llata, Librarian for Romance Languages and Latin American Studies
  • Cecilia Parks, Undergraduate Student Success Librarian
  • Bethany Mickel, Teaching and Instructional Design Librarian
  • Leigh Rockey, Video Collections Librarian
  • Christine Slaughter, Social Sciences Research Librarian

Yoon Hwa Choi, East Asian Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, College of Arts & Sciences: Students will be required to research Korean culture using authentic materials and create two 5 to 7-minute videos introducing their topic, in both Korean and English, to students with basic Korean language skills.

Library team:

  • Wei Wang, Research Librarian for East Asian Studies
  • Josh Thorud, Multimedia Teaching and Learning Librarian
  • Bethany Mickel, Teaching and Instructional Design Librarian
  • Brandon Butler, Director of Information Policy

Lisa Goff, English, College of Arts & Sciences: The course “Moving On: Migration to/from US” will include a course enrichment project designed to help the 25-30 class members better understand how their lives, and the lives of their families and friends, have intersected with migration in, to, and around the United States. We will partner with the Library to guide students in researching and documenting their own family trees, using genealogical tools and family interviews to trace their families back in time, as broad geographically as possible..

There will be other options — for example, tracing the family history of an historical figure — for students who are not comfortable with documenting the status of living family members.

Library team:

  • Sherri Brown, Librarian for English
  • Drew MacQueen, Geospatial Consultant
  • Chris Gist, Geographic Information Systems Specialist
  • Krystal Appiah, Instruction Librarian, Special Collections
  • Jean Cooper, Metadata Librarian
  • Bethany Mickel, Teaching and Instructional Design Librarian

Erin Putalik, Architectural History, School of Architecture: This project for a survey course in architectural history will teach students to find lesser-known representations of a single iconic work of early 20th century architecture, showing changes in the work or its context over the course of a half-century or more. Students will be taught to effectively use various image databases and develop annotated, image-based essays that challenge the ways these buildings are typically represented — as standing heroically outside of time, untouched by their human and environmental contexts.

Library team:

  • Rebecca Coleman, Research Librarian for Architecture
  • Bethany Mickel, Teaching and Instructional Design Librarian
  • Ann Burns, Metadata Librarian
  • Brandon Butler, Director of Information Policy

Hallie Richmond, English, College of Arts & Sciences: Students will design a virtual narrative that illustrates differences in student access to challenging and inclusive literary texts in K-12 classes across Albemarle County. The narrative will be housed in a new course website intended to serve English teachers who are seeking open educational resources related to reading and teaching literature of a challenging nature.

Library team:

  • Brandon Walsh, Head of Scholars’ Lab Student Programs
  • Sherri Brown, Librarian for English
  • Ashley Hosbach, Education and Social Science Research Librarian
  • Bethany Mickel, Teaching and Instructional Design Librarian
  • Arin Bennett, Information Visualization Specialist
  • Drew MacQueen, Geospatial Consultant
  • Chris Gist, Geographic Information Systems Specialist
  • Nancy Kechner, ADSTP Specialist

Jennifer Sessions, History, College of Arts & Sciences: Students in a new “Workshop” seminar for History majors will learn essential research skills by exploring the history of crime and scandal in fin-de-siècle Europe and building ArcGIS StoryMaps to organize, analyze, and present their research on a particular case study.

Library team:

  • Keith Weimer, Librarian for History, Politics, and Religious Studies
  • Drew MacQueen Geospatial Consultant
  • Todd Burks, Teaching and Learning Librarian
  • Bethany Mickel, Teaching and Instructional Design Librarian
  • Leigh Rockey, Video Collections Librarian

2020-2021

Christopher Ali, Media Studies, College of Arts of Sciences:  Christopher Ali, Department of Media Studies: Undergraduates will learn about the methods of policy analysis by consulting digital platforms to retrieve and organize key documents, and then apply different methods of analysis such as stakeholder analysis and discourse analysis. These methods will be applied to student’s final assignment, a critical policy memo, and will give students a foundation both in the specifics of policy analysis and in the methods of media studies more broadly

Library team:

  • Erin Pappas, Research Librarian for the Humanities
  • Cecilia Parks, Undergraduate Student Success Librarian
  • Jenn Huck, Data Librarian
  • Brandon Butler, Director, Information Policy

Federico Cuatlcuatl, Studio Art, College of Arts of Sciences:  This course will challenge and engage students in multiple modes of fabrication and digital productions through the conceptual framework of wearable self-portraits.

Library team:

  • Lucie Stylianopoulos, Research Librarian for Art, Archaeology, Classics, Indigenous Studies
  • Ammon Shepherd, Makerspace Manager
  • Josh Thorud, Multimedia Teaching and Learning Librarian
  • Arin Bennett, Information Visualization Specialist
  • Will Rourk, 3D Data & Content Specialist
  • Fang Yi, Educational Technologist

Bremen Donovan, Anthropology, College of Arts of Sciences: Students from across disciplines will be introduced to diverse modes of ethnographic research and creative practice in this course designed to broaden understanding of what rigorous scholarship can look, sound, and feel like. In addition to readings, screenings, and other interventions, students will collaboratively explore different forms of knowledge production and representation, and will engage in practical training to guide them in the conception and bringing to fruition their own small-scale experimental projects.

Library team:

  • Josh Thorud, Multimedia Teaching and Learning Librarian
  • Phil McEldowney, Librarian for Middle East and South Asia Studies
  • Krystal Appiah, Instruction Librarian, Special Collections
  • Chris Gist, Geographic Information Systems Specialist
  • Drew Macqueen, Geospatial Consultant

Erin Lambert, History, College of Arts of Sciences: Students will develop skills in historical research by tracing the travels of a single object through early modern global trade networks and presenting their projects in an ArcGIS StoryMap.

Library team:

  • Keith Weimer, Librarian for History, Politics, and Religious Studies
  • Krystal Appiah, Instruction Librarian, Special Collections
  • Chris Gist, Geographic Information Systems Specialist
  • Drew Macqueen, Geospatial Consultant
  • Lucie Stylianopoulos, Research Librarian for Art, Archaeology, Classics, Indigenous Studies
  • Ronda Grizzle, Project Management and Training Specialist

Stella Mattioli, Spanish, College of Arts of Sciences: The students of Elementary Italian will work in pairs to create an interactive picture book about an Italian cultural aspect that they will have to choose and research. 

Library team:

  • Miguel Valladares-Llata, Librarian for Romance Languages and Latin American Studies
  • Bethany Mickel, Teaching and Instructional Design Librarian
  • Josh Thorud, Multimedia Teaching and Learning Librarian

David Singerman, History, College of Arts of Sciences: First-year students will explore the 2008 financial crisis by learning to think like historians. They’ll combine scholarship, media accounts, and interviews with friends and family into multimedia projects about what it’s like to live through a major historical event.

Library team:

  • Todd Burks, Teaching and Learning Librarian
  • Keith Weimer, Librarian for History, Politics, and Religious Studies
  • Bill Corey, Research Data Management Librarian
  • Josh Thorud, Multimedia Teaching and Learning Librarian

Tyler Jo Smith, McIntire Department of Art/Interdisciplinary Archaeology Program, College of Arts and Sciences: In a seminar setting, students will learn how to research individual objects of religious significance belonging to the Fralin Museum of Art. They will share their final project results using 3D technologies of scanning, printing, and digital presentation.

Library team:

  • Lucie Stylianopoulos, Research Librarian for Art, Archaeology, Classics, Indigenous Studies
  • Bethany Mickel, Teaching and Instructional Design Librarian
  • Arin Bennett, Information Visualization Specialist
  • Will Rourk, 3D Data & Content Specialist
  • Josh Thorud, Multimedia Teaching and Learning Librarian

2019-2020

Jeffrey Boichuk, McIntire School of Commerce: Students will develop life-long skills in the areas of research, written communication, and information, strengthening their marketing projects through connection with the larger marketing literature and the business press at large. 

Library team:

  • Bill Corey (lead), Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences
  • Todd Burks, Teaching & Learning
  • Jenn Huck, Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences
  • Hanni Nabahe, Resident Librarian

Phoebe Crisman, Architecture, School of Architecture: Students will improve their ability to employ media-rich technologies and data visualization in their semester-long Think Global/Act Local project, the goal of which is to inspire sustainability action through new interactive research and communication methods. 

Library team:

  • Fang Yi (lead), Teaching & Learning
  • Todd Burks, Teaching & Learning
  • Jeremy Garritano, Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences
  • Ricky Patterson, Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences

Kevin Driscoll, Media Studies, College of Arts & Sciences: Undergraduates will engage in original research for media archival projects related to social change; the course will culminate in a museum-style exhibit based on a comparative analysis of media artifacts. 

Library team:

  • Erin Pappas (lead), Arts & Humanities
  • Bethany Mickel, Teaching & Learning
  • Stephen Villereal, Preservation Services
  • Krystal Appiah, Special Collections Library
  • Sony Prosper, Special Collections Library
  • Brandon Butler, Scholarly Communication

Bonnie Hagerman, Women, Gender & Sexuality, College of Arts & Sciences: Working with a detailed data set (created in part by the class) about Olympic medal winners, students will analyze the data to better understand the intersections of gender, race, geography, age, ability, and sexual orientation in the Games.

Library team:

  • Erin Pappas (lead), Arts & Humanities
  • Nancy Kechner, Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences
  • Bethany Mickel, Teaching & Learning

Foteini Kondyli, Art History, College of Arts & Sciences. As part of a new multilayered approach to learning about Byzantine cities, students will balance scholarly reading and writing with hands-on activities using a range digital technologies, such as 3D modeling, virtual reality, and 3D printing.

Library team:

  • Lucie Stylianopoulos (lead), Arts & Humanities
  • Arin Bennett, Scholars’ Lab
  • Will Rourk, Scholars’ Lab
  • Bethany Mickel, Teaching & Learning

Hsin-Hsin Liang (Department of East Asian Languages, Literatures, and Cultures) and Yingyao Wang (Sociology), College of Arts & Sciences: By enhancing the newly redesigned Media Chinese language course to incorporate expert lectures of current topics on China, library instruction, and media technology workshops, students will better understand scholarly information, develop research skills related to their Chinese studies, and apply newly gained media technology expertise to their video projects.

Library team:

  • Wei Wang (lead), Arts & Humanities
  • Leigh Rockey, Collection Management
  • Todd Burks, Teaching & Learning
  • Fang Yi, Teaching & Learning

Andrea Hansen Phillips, Landscape Architecture, School of Architecture. Architecture students will be introduced to the fundamentals of coding and digital technologies such as web mapping, user experience design, and data visualization, in order to elevate the role of civic engagement and public interest design.

Library team:

  • Rebecca Coleman (lead), Arts & Humanities
  • Jeremy Boggs, Scholars’ Lab
  • Jill Heinze, User Experience
  • Erich Purpur, Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences
  • Meridith Wolnick, Teaching & Learning

2018-2019

Kim Brooks Mata, Drama, College of Arts & Sciences: Students will develop the skills to engage in research in the context of artistic practice and will enhance their understanding of dance as both an expressive and investigative field.

Library team:

  • Abigail Flanigan (lead), Arts & Humanities
  • Paula Archey, Teaching & Learning

Meredith Clark, Media Studies, College of Arts & Sciences: Students will engage in a critical analysis of social media data to produce case studies about specific issues related to race and digital culture. 

Library team:

  • Erin Pappas (lead), Arts & Humanities
  • Regina Carter, Teaching & Learning
  • Jeremy Boggs, Scholar’s Lab

Max Edelson (History) and Ricardo Padron (Spanish, Italian & Portuguese), College of Arts & Sciences: Students will embark on research projects in a variety of fields of study, gaining understanding of the relationship between space, knowledge, and power, and developing competencies with research strategies and tools. 

Library team:

  • Keith Weimer (lead), Arts & Humanities
  • Todd Burks, Teaching & Learning

Sean Ferguson, Science, Technology and Society Program, School of Engineering and Applied Science: Through hands-on activities, students will learn how to combine quantitative and qualitative material to gain deep understanding of social phenomena, developing their skills in data manipulation, curation, and visualization.  

Library team:

  • Jennifer Huck (lead), Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences
  • Todd Burks, Teaching & Learning

Bonnie Gordon, Music, College of Arts & Sciences: Students will develop skills in critical reflection and information literacy as they engage with historical sources to understand how music reflects and influences history and cultural change. 

Library team:

  • Abigail Flanigan (lead), Arts & Humanities
  • Paula Archey, Teaching & Learning
  • Bethany Mickel, Teaching & Learning
  • David Whitesell, Special Collections Library

Mary Kuhn, English, College of Arts & Sciences: Students will broaden their understanding of what constitutes an environmental text, conducting research to uncover primary and secondary sources and using digital tools to practice public-facing research and writing. 

Library team:

  • Chris Ruotolo (lead), Arts & Humanities
  • Krystal Appiah, Special Collections Library
  • Meridith Wolnick, Teaching & Learning

Jonah Shulhofer-Wohl, Politics, College of Arts & Sciences: After learning how to define an answerable research question about Middle East politics, students will conduct independent research, gaining necessary skills in assessing, analyzing, and synthesizing information. 

Library team:

  • Christine Slaughter (lead), Arts & Humanities
  • Bethany Mickel, Teaching & Learning

2017-2018

Jeanine Braithwaite, Frank Batten School: Students working on their Applied Policy Projects will gain foundational information literacy skills, allowing them to choosing substantial, meaty policy problems and conduct original research on their area of policy interest.

Library team:

  • Jenn Huck, Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences
  • Bethany Mickel, Teaching & Learning

George Gilliam, History, College of Arts & Sciences: Working with archival source material, students will learn historical research methods for identifying and finding primary sources, understand the difference between primary and secondary sources, and analyze sources in order to answer a research question.

Library team:

  • Krystal Appiah, Special Collections Library
  • Bethany Mickel, Teaching & Learning
  • Keith Weimer, Arts & Humanities

Cristina Griffin, English, College of Arts & Sciences: As part of their in-depth exploration of the history of gothic literature, students will work with archival texts on a focused information literacy project, learning to form research questions, discover unexpected ways of finding answers, and interrogate information dynamically along the way.

Library team:

  • Chris Ruotolo, Arts & Humanities
  • Meridith Wolnick, Teaching & Learning
  • David Whitesell, Special Collections Library

Katelyn Hale Wood, Drama, College of Arts & Sciences: In this course, with a new emphasis on historiographical methodology, students will engage in the process of information creation, link structures of authority to the construction of historical evidence, and learn effective research strategies. 

Library team:

  • Abigail Flanigan, Arts & Humanities
  • Paula Archey, Teaching & Learning

Zaneta Hong, Landscape Architecture, School of Architecture: Students will understand and practice research and design methodologies related to materials and technologies for the built environment, in the interest of creating a sustainable, ethical, and environmentally-sensitive design practice.

Library team:

  • Rebecca Coleman, Arts and Humanities
  • Jeremy Garritano, Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences
  • Maggie Nunley, Research Data Services and Social, Natural and Engineering Sciences (then Teaching & Learning)

Deborah McGrady, French, College of Arts & Sciences: Students will learn how to conduct research – in particular to identify and find information, and evaluate its credibility – in their investigations into the historical and artistic legacy of Joan of Arc, from medieval to modern times.

Library team:

  • Todd Burks, Teaching & Learning
  • Lucie Stylianopoulos, Arts & Humanities
  • Miguel Valladares-Llata, Arts and Humanities